Pluto’s process


We all like to gain in power, but can fall into fear when we are feeling its loss. In looking at the myth of Pluto we see that the collective consciousness holds a lesson for us if we will only pay attention and give it time to work. It goes something like this …

1. We often grab hold of and won’t let go of what we think is due us. The strongest feelings of need are often attached to this, often balled up in early life parental relationships (or lack of thereof).

Pluto kidnapped Persephone to be his queen in the underworld. After all, every king needs a queen, therefore he had the right to the one he wanted, right?

We often get into trouble from the start with the approach we take. Acting as king or autocrat is generally the worst way to start. Not waiting to understand an overpowering or even irrational attraction to someone that makes us want to possess them is also one of these. Powerful urges and drives must be balanced with tenderness and respect.

2. We take for granted we should keep such arrangements as we’ve set up, and incensed when they are challenged by someone asserting equal right/power, or are devastated when they fall apart or disappear.

Persephone’s family didn’t appreciate her being taken from them. They missed her and wanted to have her back, to spend time with her. A compromise had to be negotiated so that she spent part of her time with them.

3. We find ourselves in need of healing, and on the level of material holdings or emotional ones, have to learn to let go, forgive, move on. Love has not been taken from us, but only the object of our affection. Power has not been taken from us, but only the forms we thought we permanently held. Space of consciousness can now be freed up within us to make way for new forms. This amounts to a purging on whatever level we need or can handle, often all levels simultaneously.

The worst outcome often happens when we cannot reach a compromise with others or with life itself. If we are unaware that we created the situation to start with, thinking it happened ‘to us’, then we continue oblivious to our power to create a solution, or to create something better from scratch.

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